Overview

Bina Joshi practices environmental law. Bina's experience includes helping clients with all aspects of environmental litigation matters including issues arising under the Clean Air Act, CERCLA and related state laws. She regularly helps clients with compliance matters, both in dealing with compliance issues as they arise, and helping to develop compliance programs and engage in future compliance planning. Her experience also includes representing clients in remediation matters under state and federal remediation programs. Additionally, Bina regularly helps clients respond to government requests for information, including under Section 114 of the Clean Air Act and Section 104(e) of CERCLA. She has:

  • Helped respond to several Clean Air Act Section 114 Requests
  • Worked on a number of federal New Source Review enforcement actions
  • Worked on a number of air-related common law and class action lawsuits brought under state and federal law
  • Counseled clients regarding the applicability and implementation of various federal, state and local air, water and land regulations
  • Represented clients in permit appeals, trade secret appeals and variance petitions before the Illinois Pollution Control Board
  • Conducted environmental assessments and permitting analyses for energy-related development projects
  • Worked on several remediation matters under federal and state cleanup programs
  • Represented clients in CERCLA litigation matters, including several multi-party sediment site matters
  • Conducted environmental due diligence related to the sale of assets

Previous Experience

During law school, Bina gained legal experience as a participant with the Domestic Violence Clinic at the University of Illinois College of Law. She also served as an intern with the United States Department of Homeland Security, Office of Chief Counsel.

Energy and Environmental Law Adviser

Administrative Deference Doesn’t Mean Anything Goes – Just Ask the D.C. Circuit

Administrative deference – in essence, that courts resolve close questions in favor of “expert” agencies – is a cornerstone of environmental practice and we’ve blogged frequently on this issue. Courts question agencies, however, when their decisions do not square with cited evidence. For regulatory challenges, courts also confine their review to the administrative record and... Continue Reading

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