Overview

Tom Crispi is, first and foremost, a trial lawyer. Tom began his career as an Assistant District Attorney in New York City, honing his skills as a courtroom tactician while prosecuting numerous cases.  Since leaving the District Attorney’s Office in 1996, Tom has successfully tried countless cases in areas ranging from product liability to commercial disputes.

It is Tom’s rare combination of winning courtroom skills, deep understanding of client businesses and responsiveness to client needs that sets him apart. For a corporate trial lawyer, the path toward victory so often hinges on making an early identification of the issue. Tom excels at this. While Tom has the experience to handle any matter in a courtroom, he also knows how to get results by keeping clients out of the courtroom and avoiding trial whenever possible or advisable.

Tom has served as both trial counsel and national coordinating counsel for several Fortune 100 companies in their mass tort and product liability litigation. Tom, together with his team, has successfully defended corporations in courtrooms throughout the country. Equally important, he has managed and defeated litigation with victories and resolutions often before reaching the courtroom.

Clients recognize that Tom has the experience resolve their disputes quickly and efficiently. As a testament to Tom’s ability to achieve victory, clients repeatedly ask him to step outside his defined practice area to handle litigation and take over a range of matters involving construction disputes, commercial transactions, civil rights, employment harassment, civil RICO, premises liability, fiduciary duty and intellectual property.

Product Liability and Mass Torts Blog

No Injury? No Problem.

The Supreme Court recently granted certiorari in Spokeo v. Robins, a case that has the potential to redefine standing in federal court. The Ninth Circuit’s February 2014 decision permitted plaintiff Thomas Robins to establish standing under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) with nothing more than a speculative injury. This contravenes Supreme Court precedent, which... Continue Reading

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