Schiff Hardin Attorneys Co-Author First Definitive Guide on Distributed Energy Generation

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Schiff Hardin Attorneys Co-Author First Definitive Guide on Distributed Energy Generation

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Schiff Hardin LLP is pleased to announce that three attorneys have contributed to a new, first of its kind, definitive guide about developing distributed energy generation projects. The book, Distributed Generation Law: A Guide to Regulations, Policies, and Programs, describes the transformation of the power industry, bringing the generator and user of electricity close together with powerful new renewable technologies, battery storage, and new methods to create more efficient traditional technologies. Sarah Fitts, a Schiff Hardin Energy and Infrastructure partner, co-edited the book, which is being published by the American Bar Association Section of Environment, Energy and Resources.

“At this moment, the technology is moving faster than the law and regulations, so we will need to think holistically about both,” said Fitts, who has been following the transformation of the electric system for more than two decades. “The combined pressures of climate change and energy costs, plus rising awareness of environmental justice, all point to the need for energy that can be reliable and sustainable. Distributed energy generation helps get us to that goal.”

Environmental lawyer Amy Antoniolli, co-author of “Chapter 4 – Selected States” and author of “Chapter 6 – Project Siting, Permitting and Environmental Issues,” examines current regulations in states such as Illinois, Minnesota, and Hawaii that are leading the way in the development of law and applicable policy, including within the FPA and PURPA. The chapter on siting reviews the various governmental challenges and considerations in developing projects.

Environmental Partner Jane Montgomery, author of “Chapter 11 – Climate Change,” provides a history of the evolution of modern international policies, treaties, and agreements, and how they have impacted the development of distributed generation. The chapter also covers the role of financial institutions in supporting systems that monetize emissions reductions.

More than two dozen authors with experience in energy policy and law contributed to the book, which also covers topics including project financing, cybersecurity, the future of electric vehicle charging stations, and the U.S. Department of Defense’s adoption of distributed generation throughout its operations.

Copies are available for purchase here.

To learn more about the impact of distributed generation to the power industry, read this Q&A with Schiff Hardin’s attorney authors and editor.